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Page Contents

Column 1

  • Academic Resources
  • Exemplars
  • WebQuests

Column 2

  • Overview
  • Suggested Steps
  • Project Ideas

Column 3

  • Requirements and Scoring
    • Paper
    • Image 
    • Model (optional)

Academic Resources

2017-18 Research Projects Locker

PPT, Word, Excel Viewers [Go]
Acrobat Reader [Go]

Want to Learn More? Try a WebQuest

Medieval Creativity

Overview

You will complete multi-part research project on “Medieval Creativity.”  The project will include a one-page research paper, a full-page, annotated image or graphic, and, if you choose to make one, a scale model for bonus points.  

The project will be worth 200 “Reading Writing and Research” (40% of your final grade!) points.

Your project must be entirely completed and a HARD COPY (not electronic) turned in by 4:00 PM, MONDAY, April 30 (NO EXTENSIONS).

Suggested Steps

  1. Finalize your choice of topic. Make it as specific as possible.
    Big thing to keep in mind is that your paper is supposed to be a brief exploration of some idea or thing that represents or illustrates or expresses creativity during the Middle Ages (476-1600 CE) anywhere in the world.
  2. Finalize your collection of sources (at least three).
    Arrange them alphabetically in MLA format as your Bibliography
    (Z will share a PPT that walks you through this).
  3. Take notes from your sources.
    One idea or quote, (direct quote of paraphrase) per index card.
    Be sure to include a page number (again, Z will share a PPT that walks you through this).
    Keep your eye on the project overview to make sure you are collecting notes that address the requirements for each paragraph of your paper.
  4. Sort your cards into five piles corresponding to the five paragraphs noted in the project overview.
    If you have enough focused notes, the paragraphs will practically write themselves.
  5. Start writing.
    Make sure you include, as you go, correctly-formatted in text citations to show me, the reader, from which source in your bibliography you got each piece of information (again, Z will share a PPT that walks you through this).
    YOU HAVE TO KEEP IT DOWN TO ONE PAGE of 550-650 words.
    You can lower the font size to 11 points if necessary.
    Have the instructions out and refer to them as you go…there are some very- specific formatting requirements).
  6. Have someone read / edit / suggestion revisions.
    Your editor should have the instructions out and use them as a sort of checklist.
    Then, revise your paper based on their feedback.
  7. Source or create an image to accompany your paper.
    Again, carefully refer to the project overview for the very specific requirements.
    The BIG thing to keep in mind is that the image must be “annotated.”
  8. Submit that puppy to Mr. Z or Mr. Lieberman! Congrats. You are done.

Project Ideas

Basically, you can do your project on any important or interesting innovation or invention or art that humans came up with in the 500-odd years between the fall of Rome in the West (c. 476 CE) through to the end of the Age of Exploration (c. 1620).  

Any creation developed by people in or societies of medieval China; Japan; Europe; or the Muslim world.

Any form of artwork would be appropriate to research.  

 

Japan

  • Steel manufacturing
  • bronze casting
  • metalwork
  • silk painting
  • printing
  • washi
  • lacquer-ware
  • pottery and porcelain
  • wooden construction 
  • textile silk 

China

  • Metal casting
  • Seismograph
  • Ship-building
  • Steel
  • Gunpowder
  • Deep drilling
  • Use of natural gas
  • Mechanical clock mechanisms
  • Silk
  • Porcelain
  • Rudders 
  • Suspension bridges
  • Wheelbarrows
  • The compass
  • Stirrup

Europe

  • Heavy plough 
  • Horse collar 
  • Wine press 
  • Artesian well (1126)
  • Central heating through underfloor channels 
  • Rib vault 
  • Chimney 
  • Segmental arch bridge  
  • Treadwheel crane 
  • Stationary harbor crane 
  • Floating crane
  • Mast crane
  • Wheelbarrow
  • Oil painting (perspective, etc.)
  • Hourglass
  • Mechanical clocks
  • Compound crank
  • Blast furnace
  • Paper mill
  • Rolling mill
     

Requirements and Scoring

Scoring

 (Research Scoring Rubric 2018.docx)

Research Paper Scoring (100 Summative Assessment points)

  • You turned something in on time with your name on it
    • Zwolinski: 50 points
    • Liberman: 45 points
  • 5 points:  Correct format, including a heading
  • 5 points: Correct length (one page; 600 words, plus or minus 50)
  • 5 points: Introductory (first) “what” paragraph
  • 5 points: Second, “who / where / when / why” paragraph
  • 5 points: Third, “how-it-worked / was-made” paragraph
  • 5 points: Concluding, fourth, “why do we care?” paragraph
  • 5 points: Accuracy of information
  • 5 points: Correctly formatted and complete in-text citations and bibliography
  • 5 points: Perfect conventions (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and grammar)
  • 5 points (Liberman only): 2 annotated sources with Xodo or printed out

Image Scoring (100 Summative Assessment Points)

  • 50 points:You turned something in, on time, with your name on it.
  • 10 points:Image is a full page
  • 10 points:Image is in full-color
  • 10 points:Labels are neat, clear, detailed  and accurate
  • 10  points:Image is captioned correctly
  • 10 points:Image is “neat and complete”

Scale Model Scoring (optional; up to 50 bonus points)

  • Model may be purchased and assembled (e.g., a plastic model) or built from scratch.  
    It may NOT be purchased “finished and complete” – you have to build it. (BONUS 10 points)
  • Must be historically accurate (BONUS 10 points)
  • Unless it’s life-size or really big, it must sit on some sort of presentation stand (BONUS 10 points)
  • Must be accompanied by a card or plaque that names the example of creativity, the people or society that developed it, the approximate date it was developed and / or used, and include, in parentheses, your full name,
    e.g., “Cathedral stained-glass windows, circa 1300 CE (Johnny Zwoski)” (BONUS 10 points)
  • The model must reflect careful, thoughtful, patient execution:  It must be “neat and complete.” (BONUS 10 points)

Research Paper Requirements

  • Format:  12 point Times New Roman font; standard one-inch margins (top, bottom, left, right); single-spaced
  • Heading:  Must include full name, name of course, date of completion, and title of project (again, all in Times New Roman, 12-point font).
  • Length:  One page (600 words, + or - up to 50, not including the separate bibliography page).
  • Content:  
    • Introductory paragraph: briefly explains or defines what your example of Medieval creativity was and what it was used for
    • Second paragraph: describes who (what person or culture or kingdom or society or state, etc.) created your example; when and where  it was developed; and why (in response to what need) it was developed
    • Third paragraph: clearly and concisely describing how the example of creativity worked and / or how it was made (what materials were used, what process was involved, etc.)
    • Concluding paragraph: explains the historical, cultural significance of your example of creativity (in other words, why was it important THEN?  And, why do we care TODAY?)
    • Bibliography:  
      • On a separate page, with the heading “Bibliography,” list, in correct format (specific details to follow) list at least three sources you used to conduct your research.  At least one must be a book. The Bibliography MUST be in MLA format (remember www.citethisforme.com ?).  
      • Your paper must have at least one correctly-formatted IN TEXT CITATION for each one of your Bibliographical sources.

Image

You must create and  turn in some sort of visual – a picture, photograph, diagram, drawing – that helps your reader (Mr. Z) understand precisely what the various parts / features of your example of creativity were and how your example of creativity worked and / or was made.

  • Your image must fill a full page (e.g., not a half page or two-thirds of a page; not two pages).
  • It may be printed, photocopied, or hand-drawn.
  • Your image must be in color:  drawn and colored, or printed in color, or printed in black-and-white and hand-colored.
  • All important features / details / parts of the example of creativity must be labeled accurately (label boxes with arrows). You can do this freehand or you can use computer software
  • The image must be captioned (a label underneath the image) with the name of the example of creativity, the people or society that created it, the approximate date or period it was created and / or  used, and must include, in parentheses, your full name, e.g., “Cathedral stained-glass windows, circa 1300 CE (Johnny Zwoski)”
  • The image must reflect careful, thoughtful, patient execution:  It must be “neat and complete.”

Scoring (100 Reading Writing and Research Points)

  • 50 points: You turned something in, on time, with your name on it.
  • 10 points: Image is a full page
  • 10 points: Image is in full-color
  • 10 points: Labels are neat, clear, detailed  and accurate
  • 10  points: Image is captioned correctly (see above)
  • 10 points: Image is “neat and complete”
     

Scale Model (optional)

You may opt to build a model of your example of creativity for up to 50 bonus points (in other words, to make up points you may lose on the paper or image parts of the project) up to 200 total project points.

Scoring (up to 50 bonus points)

  • Model may be purchased and assembled (e.g., a plastic model) or built from scratch.  It may NOT be purchased “finished and complete” – you have to build it. (BONUS 10 points)
  • Must be historically accurate (BONUS 10 points)
  • Unless it’s life-size or really big, it must sit on some sort of presentation stand (BONUS 10 points)
  • The model must be accompanied by a card or plaque that names the example of creativity, the people or society that developed it, the approximate date it was developed and / or used, and include, in parentheses, your full name, e.g., “Cathedral stained-glass windows, circa 1300 CE (Johnny Zwoski)” (BONUS 10 points)
  • The model must reflect careful, thoughtful, patient execution:  It must be “neat and complete.” (BONUS 10 points)